About Tabitha

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Tabitha Suzuma is of Anglo-Japanese descent and was born in London, the eldest of five children. She attended a French school in the UK and grew up bilingual. However, she hated school and would sit at the back of the class and write stories. Aged 14, Tabitha left school against her parents' wishes. She got a job as an assistant dance teacher and also worked at a centre for children with Cerebral Palsy. She continued her education through distance learning and went on to study French Literature at King's College London. After graduating, Tabitha worked as a primary school teacher and wrote her first novel, A NOTE OF MADNESS, whilst teaching full-time. In 2004 Tabitha left classroom teaching and began to divide her time between writing and tutoring. This gave her time to write her next four novels: FROM WHERE I STAND - a psychological thriller. WITHOUT LOOKING BACK - about a family on the run. A VOICE IN THE DISTANCE - sequel to A NOTE OF MADNESS. And then her latest book, and most controversial and challenging book to date: FORBIDDEN, about consensual sibling incest: a brother and sister who fall in love. Tabitha is currently working on her sixth novel.

Saturday, November 05, 2011

Favourite scenes and quotes from my favourite movie: The Hours




One of my favourite scenes: 
"If I were thinking clearly, Leonard, I would tell you that I wrestle alone in the dark, in the deep dark. And that only I can know, only I can understand my own condition. You live with the threat, you tell me you live with the threat of my extinction. Leonard, I live with it too. This is my right; it is the right of every human being. I choose not the suffocating anesthetic of the suburbs but the violent jolt of the Capital. That is my choice. The meanest patient, yes, even the very lowest is allowed some say in the matter of her own prescription. Thereby she defines her humanity. I wish, for your sake, Leonard, I could be happy in this quietness. But if it is a choice between Richmond and death, I choose death."

A woman's whole life in a single day. Just one day. And in that day her whole life.

Leonard, I believe I may have a first sentence.


Did it matter, then, she asked herself, walking toward Bond Street. Did it matter that she must inevitably cease, completely. All this must go on without her. Did she resent it? Or did it not become consoling to believe that death ended absolutely? It is possible to die... It is possible to die...

It's on this day. This day of all days. Her fate becomes clear to her.

My life has been stolen from me. I'm living in a town I have no wish to live in... I'm living a life I have no wish to live... How did this happen?

If I were thinking clearly, Leonard, I would tell you that I wrestle alone in the dark, in the deep dark, and that only I can know. Only I can understand my condition. You live with the threat, you tell me you live with the threat of my extinction. Leonard, I live with it too.

This is my right; it is the right of every human being. I choose not the suffocating anesthetic of the suburbs, but the violent jolt of the capital, that is my choice. The meanest patient, yes, even the very lowest is allowed some say in the matter of her own prescription. Thereby she defines her humanity.

You cannot find peace by avoiding life.

But I still have to face the hours, don't I? I mean, the hours after the party, and the hours after that...

That is what we do. That is what people do. They stay alive for each other!

He gives me that look ... to say your life is trivial. You are so trivial.

Your aunt is a very lucky woman Angelica. She has two lives. The life she is living, and the book she is writing.

I think I'm staying alive just to satisfy you.


Oh, it's about this woman who's incredibly - well, she's a hostess and she's incredibly confident and she's going to give a party. And, maybe because she's confident, everyone thinks she's fine... but she isn't...

It would be wonderful to say you regretted it! It would be easy. But what does it mean? What does it mean to regret when you have no choice? It's what you can bear ... It was death. I chose life.

Oh, Mrs. Dalloway ... Always giving parties to cover the silence.


Why is everything wrong?

Someone has to die in order that the rest of us should value life more.

- What happens when we die?
- What happens? We return to the place that we came from.

- Say something, Nessa! Didn't you think I seemed better? Do you think I may 
  one day escape?
- One day, Virginia. One day...

I remember one morning getting up at dawn, there was such a sense of possibility. You know, that feeling? And I remember thinking to myself: so, this is the beginning of happiness. This is where it starts. And of course there will always be more! ... It never occurred to me it wasn't the beginning. It was happiness. It was the moment. Right then.

What I'm saying is that even crazy people like to be asked.

- We want everything, don't we?
- I suppose we do.

I've stayed alive for you. But now you have to let me go.

When I'm with him I feel - yes, I am living. And when I'm not with him - yes, everything does seem sort of silly.

To look life in the face, always, to look life in the face and to know it for what it is. At last to know it, to love it for what it is, and then, to put it away.

Leonard, always the years between us, always the years. Always the love ... Always the hours.

Ed Harris as Richard Brown in The Hours
HAVE YOU SEEN THE MOVIE? COMMENT TO SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS.

3 comments:

  1. isnt this movie based on a book?

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  2. Hi Sarah! Yes it is, The Hours by Michael Cunningham. It's also one of my favourite books but I think the movie is even better. :)

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  3. I love this film too, though it has some limitations - inevitably Woolf gets a bit Hollywoodised, for example. But the entwining of the three stories, and the fact that it manages to make them all equally memorable, is pretty impressive. I adore the shot looking down the dark lift well with Clarissa coming up bearing roses.

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